Moving On

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The suicide of a loved one leaves lasting wound. We’ve assembled some resources for recovery from Vanessa Shaw-Finelli’s book, "Losing Rebecca." IF YOU’RE CONSIDERING SUICIDE. Avoid drugs and alcohol, which contribute to uncontrollable impulses. They also interfere with medications that treat depressive disorders. Put your thoughts down on paper, along with your hopes for the […]


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The suicide of a loved one leaves lasting wound. We’ve assembled some resources for recovery from Vanessa Shaw-Finelli’s book, "Losing Rebecca."

IF YOU’RE CONSIDERING SUICIDE.

Avoid drugs and alcohol, which contribute to uncontrollable impulses. They also interfere with medications that treat depressive disorders.

Put your thoughts down on paper, along with your hopes for the future. Write down the names of the people that you value and what kind of void you’d leave in their lives if you were gone. Reading these things when you are depressed will remind you how important your own life is.

IF SOMEONE YOU KNOW MAY BE CONSIDERING SUICIDE.

Listen to them. Never discount a threat of suicide as self-pity. Too often, it is a last cry for help.

Explain in the most specific terms possible how valuable that person’s life is to you and to others. Show them how their death would affect the people around them.

Keep them away from firearms, drugs and alcohol.

Contact local services that can guide you toward treatment and counseling options.

Valuable Web sites and telephone numbers:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

www.cdc.gov/safeusa/suicide.htm 

1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433) 

American Association of Suicidology

(202) 237-2280

www.suicidology.org

Provides information on current research, prevention and surviving. 

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Toll-free (888) 333-AFSP (2377)

www.afsp.org

Provides research, education and current statistics regarding suicide. 

American Psychiatric Association

Toll-free (800) 852-8330

www.psych.org

Offers referrals to psychiatrists in your area. 

American Psychological Association

Toll-free (800) 964-2000

www.apa.org

Offers referrals to psychologists in your area.