One Great Room

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Fashion icon Adrienne Vittadini’s passion for architecture and interior design resonates through her homes in New York City, the Hamptons and Italy. But in Sarasota—where, working with local architect Clifford Scholtz, she and her husband, Gigi, have built and sold several homes—she adds a singular nuance: Each room’s decor enhances the beauty of the outdoors. […]


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Fashion icon Adrienne Vittadini’s passion for architecture and interior design resonates through her homes in New York City, the Hamptons and Italy. But in Sarasota—where, working with local architect Clifford Scholtz, she and her husband, Gigi, have built and sold several homes—she adds a singular nuance: Each room’s decor enhances the beauty of the outdoors.

To heighten the impact of the stunning New Pass views in her newest Sarasota home, which is for sale for $11 million, Vittadini opted for tone-on-tone color, rich wood patinas and handcrafted architectural details.

“The only pattern in the room is the toile de Jouy,” she says. “It’s as modern as a toile can be.” Architecture is the same as fashion, Vittadini concludes. “If you have a developed eye, you can do any aspect of design. But to me, antiques, art and architecture—the ambiance in the home—give more joy than clothes. They have lasting value.”

An antique French matelasse quilt design called The Marriage is reproduced using ancient techniques by Else C, a source discovered at Paris’ Maison et Objet design fair.

European-quality upholstery specified for the quilted headboard and antique settee (found at Steven Postans) is the handiwork of Joy Abbott from the Upholstery Shop in Sarasota.

Draperies by Robby’s Designs use an airy toile de Jouy (from KA of Spain) to provide pattern without fighting the beauty of the outdoors.

Adorning Stark Carpet’s Suzanni needlepoint rug are flowering shrubs and rosettes, classic Turkish tapestry motifs chosen to complement to the toile.

Wool Berber carpet from G. Fried Flooring gives the illusion the bed is floating in the room, says Vittadini, who also likes its coziness underfoot.

Vittadini antiques “nonstop” around the globe, acquiring the Swedish chairs at New York’s Armory Show, tables in Belgium and reclining nude in Miami.

Azure water is reflected in a wall of mirror-paneled doors built by Perrone Construction to Vittadini’s drawings based on Old World examples from favorite Parisian hotels.